A Hollywood screen writer couldn't come up with a better story than the one playing out at an Osprey Nest in Rome. Our wildlife photographer, William Straite has been sharing incredible photos of the ongoing saga as two male Ospreys fight for the heart of one female.

If you missed any of the previous episodes of, "As the Bird Turns" here's a quick recap. A male and female Osprey set up a home near Rome after returning from winter migration. William captured their mating ritual, which went on for a couple of weeks. The eggs were laid and everyone kicked back to wait for the babies to arrive. Until… another male Osprey attacked the nest. Following a fierce aerial dog fight between the two, the original male never returned and the female spurned the intruder. The story ended with a perfect cliff hanger as the female was left frantically calling for her mate.

The new season begins with William returning to the nesting site and to everyone's surprise, the original male, who was presumed dead, has returned home.

although the original male is back, things have not returned to normal, not even close. They have gone from care free and relaxing to being hyper vigilant, consistently on guard.

The couple have significantly fortified the nest and continue to build. The rogue Male has not given up his attempt to take over the nest, William witnessed him in the distance as the Osprey mates displayed a show of force using their wings. And once the male left the nest to hunt for food, the Rogue moved in and tried to mate with the female. He fled upon the original male's return.

Stay tuned for more "As the Bird Turns." Meantime check out these updated photos from the nest.

Male Osprey in Rome Returns to Nest After Attack

Osprey pair in Rome, Osprey Pair in Rome building nest, Osprey Pair in Rome protecting nest

Osprey Pair's Nest Under Attack in Rome

A male and female Osprey, mating and nesting eggs for weeks is attacked and taken over by another male bird.

Osprey Pair in Rome Continue Their Mating Ritual for Two More Weeks

Pair of Osprey mates in Rome continue their mating ritual two weeks after they first started.